Horrible Bosses on Wordy Wednesday

Over the past weekend it seemed apparent I needed some serious comedy after a weekend hospital visit to rejuvenate so I spent some time cruising through the On Demand list of comedic claptrap and came across Horrible Bosses (2011) with Jason Bateman, Jennifer Aniston and Jason Sudeikis. No, I did not watch much of the Bronco game…remember I said comedic, not horribly tragic (could there be a worse team in football right now?). This fun release is 106 minutes of pretty mindless silliness that made me smile at some of the lines. Having worked for my own version of a Horrible Boss back in the day, I began to wonder if I was being a horrible boss to the Ranch hands after handing out today’s safety memo at our morning ‘Editor’s meeting.’Elsa & Sam ~ editor's meeting


~ SAFETY MEMO ~

To:            All Ranch Hands
FROM:     Resident  Horrible Boss Management
Date:         October 17, 2018

It has come to the attention of management that adherence to promulgated safety concerns are being ignored. Safety of management on daily walks is paramount to the continually providing of benefits (meals, treats, romps in the snow, endless patience on potty breaks during winter weather, etc.). See New Rules and Poodle Rules for specifics.

Henceforth it would be most appreciated if (a) Sam, you didn’t walk in front of management on walks and (b) Elsa, you would not walk behind management’s back to get back into simpatico balance while Sam executes his “let’s cut in front of management” move, simultaneously.

The weather has gotten significantly cooler and gloves are now the accoutrement du jour for walks, please note it will take time getting used to holding two leashes, two poop bags, while keeping everything upright without slipping on wet leaves (or worse) with gloves. No doubt management will make the necessary adjustments with time and practice but your cooperation during the transition would be appreciated.

Please contact Management if you have any concerns or questions. Remember the door is always open to the bathroom since personal boundaries were abandoned years ago. Thank you.

Signed,
The Ranch Manager


What do you think the odds are that the Ranch hands will think I’m a horrible boss and do you think there’s any chance they’ll comply with the latest safety request? Yeah, I thought the same thing. Maybe I should remind them that I’m not a dentist.

Live, love, bark! 🐾

Monday Musings ~ October 15, 2018

Hey sports fan…it’s me, Sam. Did you know this is National Veterinary Technician Week? First celebrated in 1993, the third week of October each year honors the heroes in animal care — vet techs. Yes it’s true that I act kind terrified a little scared whenever a tech takes my temperature (but, um…excuse me…how’d you feel if I jammed a cold tube up your…well you know). But you gotta admit, I still wag my tail every time you come into the exam room.

Truth is, I have a personal interest in hoping all Vet Techs have a good week. Mom’s granddaughter in Hawaii is a vet tech and works at a pet hospital in Kona. Like all techs, our Hailey does all kinds of work including taking pertinent background info before the vet comes in and talks with the client about their pet. She handles all the basic questions, cleans kennels, restrains animals, draws blood and gives certain injections and vaccines as permitted by statute. She helps take X-rays and ultrasounds and monitors sedation procedures. She also runs blood work after a draw.  

A vet tech’s duties often encompasses far more work depending on the vet for whom they work. It’s probably easier to list the things they can’t do. Vet techs are not permitted to diagnose, perform surgery or prescribe medication.

Veterinary technicians typically work with vets in private practices, hospitals, research labs, and zoos. These days they are an important part of the professional veterinary team, but that hasn’t always been the case. The first “animal technician” program was created back in the 1960s, before then, veterinarians hired students or office workers to do much of the basic work and routine tasks. As the field of animal health became more complex, a need arose for a well-educated staff that could take on greater responsibilities and duties developed.

Even my weirdo Ninja sister loves our Hailey girl. This week we salute you and all vet techs and applaud the terrific job you perform. Have a great week, dear Hailey. We love and miss you and are so proud of all you’ve accomplished.

Miss Hailey with the Ninja

Live, love, bark! 🐾

Birthday Monday ~ October 8, 2018

Yesterday was a big day around the Ranch. We had a little celebration going on for our favorite Knucklehead who officially became a ‘teenager.’ That’s right, Sam turned 13 yesterday and celebrated like all ‘teens’ do, with a more active social media presence. If you missed his pics, you can see them here on Instagram. Then there were Greenies. Lots of Greenies.

He and I took a walk over to our neighborhood pup shop “Taj Mutt Hal” for his birthday treat and then hung out for a bit in Highlands Square letting him  be the center of attraction at the shops. It was nice spending time alone with him without a certain little Ninja trying to bogart his spotlight.  I guess in dog years, Sam would be around 79 which is probably why he’s been asking when his Social Security check will arrive. 

Elsa did get in on the afternoon celebration and offered her ‘design’ skills to rearrange a favorite toy I made for her last year. Unlike his sister, Sam doesn’t mind appendages. I think she’s been texting our favorite pair of Weimaraners for tips on how to make confetti. She’s a novice compared to the “Overlook Twins” but can sub in at any time if you have a deconstruction project. Having already eviscerated the one arm, perhaps she decided it needed to be balanced. At least she’s not a Picasso-type designer, right? Any have odds on how long the legs will stay intact now?

At any rate, both pups enjoyed a few extra treats yesterday and we managed to get some training time in using them.

“Wait” is a hard lesson to learn when chicken treats are used

Hope you had a great weekend. It sure seemed to have gone by extra quickly for us. For those of you who acknowledge it, have a Happy Columbus Day. We’ll use this day to reflect on the plight of indigenous people while waiting for mail that won’t arrive until tomorrow. Enjoy a short work week presuming you have today off.

Live, love, bark! 🐾

Floral Friday ~ August 10, 2018

Hello and welcome to Floral Friday. With only 43 days until the official arrival of Autumn (YAY!) the garden is starting to wind down. Most of the perennials are starting to get slightly beyond their best blooming days and the big star in the garden is one with a funny name, Hardy Plumbago (sometimes known as Leadwort). Years ago I began the process of removing all turf grass in the yard in favor of ground covers and perennials. With an oversized corner lot, constant water restrictions, I decided long ago that growing ‘hay’ (otherwise known as grass) was not the way I wanted to spend summer, watering, mowing, fertilizing…repeat. And for what, a plain old carpet of green. Umm, no thank you.

Along the garden path

Recently, this ground cover began to blossom with its trademark blue flowers. Blooming over the next month or so, Hardy Plumbago is a long-lived groundcover that slowly weaves itself through the garden fabric, creating large drifts of fall color. The deep blue flowers are numerous and long-lasting. Plants are anywhere from 6-8″ tall and grow to about 18″ wide. It naturalizes easily and after planting the initial two flats of plants, it’s filled in nicely around the flagstone path. It can tolerate mild foot traffic so I don’t have to worry by the Knuckleheads stomping wandering through.

Closeup of Hardy Plumbago

Once the flowers have bloomed, the leaves will turn a gorgeous shade of mahogany throughout the autumn. Plumbago is extremely adaptable,, drought tolerant, grows well in sun or shade, and thrives in all types of soil. While slow to leaf out in the spring, this group cover is worth the wait.  6-8″ tall x 18″ wide and will grow in Zones 5 through 9 easily. Plumbago is deer resistant and attracts butterflies. Last year’s abundant Painted Lady butterflies enjoyed noshing on their nectar.

Hardy Plumbago in the autumn garden

Seeing this garden beauty convinces me that cooler temps are on the way. How’s your garden holding up this time of year? Got any plans for the weekend?

Live, love, bark! 🐾